3 Hour Activities


ARTESANÍAS DE COLOMBIA
24-01 Carrera 8B, Local 5
+57-51-286-1766 ext. 220
artesaniasdecolombia.com.co
10am–7pm Mondays to Saturdays

EDGAR GÓMEZ ESTÉVEZ
24-01 Calle 24
+57-300-805-8753
edgargomezestevez.com

CAFE DEL MURAL LABORATORIO
25-60 Calle San Juan
+57-321-288-9323
facebook.com/CafedelMural
3pm–8pm Mondays to Saturdays

MALAGANA CAFE & BAR
31-55 Calle Tripita y Media
+57-5-660-1360
facebook.com/malaganacafe
4pm–11pm Mondays to Saturdays

DEMENTE
29-29 Carrera 10, Plaza de la Trinidad
+57-5-660-4226
facebook.com/demente.com.co
6pm–2am daily

EXPLORE CARTAGENA’S COOLER SIDE

  • Join stylish locals in the bohemian quarter of Getsemaní
  • Pick up a hand-sewn guayabera from famed designer Edgar Gómez Estévez
  • Perk up with cumin-and-cinnamon-spiked coffee

While many visitors stick to the tried-and-true environs of the Old City, one of Cartagena’s most exciting enclaves lies just beyond those fortress walls, hiding in plain sight. The bohemian quarter of Getsemaní, tattooed with vibrant murals and bursting with local flavor, is well worth a few hours of exploration—ideally in late afternoon, when the midday heat subsides. If you’ve been wondering where dapper Cartagena men find their crisp guayabera shirts and elegantly tailored linen jackets, follow them to the emporium of menswear designer Edgar Gómez Estévez. Estévez’s clients include Bill Gates and the King of Spain, and his hand-sewn pieces are all made right here in Cartagena. Nearby, shop for iconic local crafts—mochila bags, hammocks, hats, woven baskets—at Artesanías de Colombia. A few blocks east, duck into Cafe del Mural Laboratorio for expertly brewed Colombian coffee. Owner David Arzayus is more alchemist than barista, roasting his own beans and concocting signature blends tinged with cumin, cinnamon, and house-made fruit infusions. Cocktail hour calls for a stop at the family-run Malagana Cafe & Bar, which put Getsemaní on the radar of intrepid travelers. Ascend the stairs to a petite rooftop studded with turquoise planters; admire the patchwork of hand-painted tiles on the patio floor, and settle in like a regular with a passion-fruit caipiroska. As evening descends, saunter over to the impromptu street party in Plaza de la Trinidad, where locals and the backpack set chat over beers as buskers play exuberant tunes. For dinner, slip into Demente, a revamped 18th-century-ruin-turned-trendy-tapas-bar just off the plaza. Cool down in the dimly lit bar or camp out at one of the communal picnic tables in the relaxed backyard. The two-bite bocata—a Colombian version of a slider, with slow-braised oxtail or baby-back-rib meat—and panfried chontaduro (palm chestnut) gnocchi both have locals hooked. Lean back in your silver rocking chair and sip a potent mojito as a soundtrack of funk, samba, and reggae spins.

The Getsemaní district is just east of the Old City, and roughly a 30-minute car ride from Conrad Cartagena (without traffic). Ask your driver to drop you at the Convention Center in Getsemaní; from there, you can easily walk to other points of interest.

ARTESANÍAS DE COLOMBIA
24-01 Carrera 8B, Local 5
+57-51-286-1766 ext. 220
artesaniasdecolombia.com.co
10am–7pm Mondays to Saturdays

EDGAR GÓMEZ ESTÉVEZ
24-01 Calle 24
+57-300-805-8753
edgargomezestevez.com

CAFE DEL MURAL LABORATORIO
25-60 Calle San Juan
+57-321-288-9323
facebook.com/CafedelMural
3pm–8pm Mondays to Saturdays

MALAGANA CAFE & BAR
31-55 Calle Tripita y Media
+57-5-660-1360
facebook.com/malaganacafe
4pm–11pm Mondays to Saturdays

DEMENTE
29-29 Carrera 10, Plaza de la Trinidad
+57-5-660-4226
facebook.com/demente.com.co
6pm–2am daily

DIVE INTO COLOMBIAN CUISINE

  • Discover Cartagena’s thriving street-food scene on a walking tour
  • Snack on local favorites like hearty arepas con huevos and chicharróns
  • Learn the city’s secrets as you feast your way from Centro to Getsemaní

Cartagena is not a city that takes food lightly. On nearly every plaza or cobblestoned calle you’ll find yet another grinning vendor hawking savory and sweet treats. But where to begin? Who makes the must-try arepas de queso? And what, exactly, is everyone ravenously slurping from those strange tube-shaped plastic bags? Answers can be found via the brilliant local tour company Cartagena Connections. Bring your appetite and follow along on a small-group street-food crawl that touches on history, architecture, culture, and, of course, all manner of fabulous food. The outfit was founded by Australian-born Kristy Ellis, who makes the disclaimer that she is “not a tour guide” per se, but more like “a friend who eats and talks a lot.” Kristy’s only rule, besides keeping an open mind, is to let someone know if they have food in their teeth. (“It’s part of the circle of trust,” she laughs.) You’ll savor pillowy arepas con huevos, the Colombian breakfast of champions, from an unassuming street-corner stall, and platters of succulent pork chicharróns at a marvelous hole-in-the-wall joint. All the while, Kristy drops interesting cultural tidbits and who-knew? details—like the significance of those ornate door knockers adorning buildings in the walled city; or what the gentrification of Getsemaní means for local residents. She’ll even teach you a few simple champeta (Afro-Colombian folk music) dance steps to trot out at the clubs. As for those tube-shaped bags? They’re filled with deliciously hydrating agua de coco, a Cartagena favorite, and best sampled from any cart with a long line in front of it.

The Conrad concierge can book you on one of Kristy Ellis’s street-food tours—or you can contact Cartagena Connections directly to reserve a spot. Tours are typically offered Monday through Saturday (excluding public holidays) at 2:30 p.m.; you’ll meet at the Parque Fernandez de Madrid in Centro, which is approximately a 30-minute trip from the Conrad without traffic.

CARTAGENA CONNECTIONS
BUSINESS ADDRESS
+57-301-321-3533
cartagenaconnections.com/

SILVIA TCHERASSI
31-11 Carrera 3, Plaza Santa Teresa
+57-5-664-9403
silviatcherassi.com
10am–8pm Mondays to Saturdays, 1pm–7pm Sundays

GABI ARENAS
04-11 Calle Vélez Danies, Plaza de Bolívar
+57-5-664-2927
facebook.com/TIENDAGABIARENAS
9am–8pm daily

KETTY TINOCO
Calle Baloco, Edificio Piñeres, Local 1
+57-5-664-0525
kettytinoco.com
10am–7:30pm Mondays to Thursdays, 10am–8:30pm Fridays and Saturdays, 11:30am–7:30pm Sundays

ST. DOM
33-70 Calle Santo Domingo
+57-1-635-4380
stdom.co
10am–8pm Mondays to Saturdays, 4pm–8pm Sundays

CASA CHIQUI
36-127 Calle de la Universidad
+57-5-668-5429
casachiqui.com
10am–10pm daily

SHOP LIKE A LOCAL

  • Hit Cartagena’s top boutiques for innovative men’s and women’s fashion
  • Visit the country’s preeminent contemporary-design shop
  • Uncover a globe-trotting socialite’s trove of antiques and stylish housewares

Colombian style is a sophisticated blend of forward-thinking design with a reverent nod to folk traditions, and a spin through the city’s chic boutiques will have you looking the Cartagenero part. Start near the Plaza de Santa Teresa at the local flagship of Colombian designer Silvia Tcherassi, who’s achieved global renown with her ethereal evening and ready-to-wear clothing for women (her most recent line was inspired by the female characters of Gabriel García Márquez). From here, make your way three minutes northeast to Gabi Arenas, where sumptuous Colombian leather provides the canvas for artfully hand-stamped wallets, bright handbags, and delightful driving mocs. Walk two blocks west to find the excellent shop run by Cartagena designer Ketty Tinoco, who spins luxurious linens into high-fashion guayaberas for men and silk-and-lace couture confections for women. Tinoco works primarily in white, ivory, cream, and other light hues, which locals prefer to wear to combat the oppressive heat. Half a block north you’ll come upon the fabulous St. Dom, a high-design concept store set in a 300-year-old colonial residence—though it could easily be mistaken for a contemporary-art museum. Jewelry, casual menswear, swimwear that makes a splash, and fabulous patterned frocks dreamed up by independent local designers are all on show here. Finally, seven minutes away on Calle de la Universidad, Casa Chiqui is an interiors wonderland set in a restored 1930’s warehouse, and stocked with unique finds from globe-trotting Colombian socialite Chiqui Echavarría’s travels: antique Balinese bowls, silver Turkish cups, detailed Mexican textiles, and hand-painted Colombian carnival masks, as well as the owner’s eponymous designs.

All of these boutiques are within walking distance of Plaza Santa Teresa in Centro, roughly 30 minutes’ drive from the Conrad Cartagena.

SILVIA TCHERASSI
31-11 Carrera 3, Plaza Santa Teresa
+57-5-664-9403
silviatcherassi.com
10am–8pm Mondays to Saturdays, 1pm–7pm Sundays

GABI ARENAS
04-11 Calle Vélez Danies, Plaza de Bolívar
+57-5-664-2927
facebook.com/TIENDAGABIARENAS
9am–8pm daily

KETTY TINOCO
Calle Baloco, Edificio Piñeres, Local 1
+57-5-664-0525
kettytinoco.com
10am–7:30pm Mondays to Thursdays, 10am–8:30pm Fridays and Saturdays, 11:30am–7:30pm Sundays

ST. DOM
33-70 Calle Santo Domingo
+57-1-635-4380
stdom.co
10am–8pm Mondays to Saturdays, 4pm–8pm Sundays

CASA CHIQUI
36-127 Calle de la Universidad
+57-5-668-5429
casachiqui.com
10am–10pm daily

ROUTE OF GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ TOUR
+5756663991
tourincartagena.com

ÁBACO BOOKSTORE AND CAFE
Calle de la Iglesia at Calle de la Mantilla
+57-5-664-8338
abacolibros.com
9am–9pm Mondays to Saturdays, 3pm–9pm Sundays and holidays

WALK IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF MÁRQUEZ

  • Learn the remarkable story of Nobel Prize–winning author Gabriel García Márquez
  • Trace the writer’s path through his beloved Cartagena with a local historian
  • Refresh with cold-brew coffee and shop for literary classics at a charming bookstore-café

The novelist, short-story writer, journalist, and screenwriter Gabriel García Márquez spent a brief yet influential period in this Caribbean port city; in fact, his ashes were interred here after his death in 2014. Gabo, as he’s affectionately known, was born some 90 miles east, in the Colombian city of Aracataca, in 1927. As a young man he veered from the law career his father had prescribed for him and found a new calling as a journalist while studying in Cartagena. Years later—after a succession of acclaimed novels and a Nobel Prize in 1982—the author chose Cartagena as the location for the Gabriel García Márquez Foundation for New Latin American Journalism (FNPI), founded in 1994. The foundation continues its work to advance excellence in journalism in Ibero-American countries and the Caribbean. You’ll touch on that legacy and much more of Márquez’s astonishing career as you walk in his footsteps on the Route of García Márquez tour, led by the historian and language scholar Marelvy Peña-Hall. Dressed in the traditional white garb of Cartagena locals, Marelvy glides you through the city’s twisting streets to the palm-shaded university courtyard where the author took up his pen, to the doorstep of colonial-era homes that set the stage for Love in the Time of Cholera, and to a convent-turned-hotel featured in Of Love and Other Demons (notice the massive portrait of the artist on display in the courtyard). If you’re not up on the work of Colombia’s most rightly celebrated writer, the charming Ábaco Bookstore and Café has you covered. While the stock is mostly Spanish-language books, there’s a selection of English titles as well, including a corner dedicated to the beloved Gabo. Refresh with a limonada de coco or a cup of cold-brew coffee at one of the shop’s communal tables.

The Conrad concierge can confirm upcoming schedules and book your walking tour with Marelvy Peña-Hall, or you can contact her directly on the number and website below. You’ll meet in the Centro, about 30 minutes from the hotel by taxi.

ROUTE OF GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ TOUR
+5756663991
tourincartagena.com

ÁBACO BOOKSTORE AND CAFE
Calle de la Iglesia at Calle de la Mantilla
+57-5-664-8338
abacolibros.com
9am–9pm Mondays to Saturdays, 3pm–9pm Sundays and holidays

ÉPOCA ESPRESSO BAR
34-52 Calle de Arzobispado
+57-5-664-1806
facebook.com/weare.epoca
8am–9pm daily

MUSEO DE ARTE MODERNO DE CARTAGENA
4-08 Calle 30, Plaza San Pedro Claver
mamcartagena.org
9am–12pm and 3pm–7pm Mondays to Fridays, 4pm–9pm weekends and holidays

NH GALERIA
33-36 Carrera 2
+57-5-664-0561
nhgaleria.com
10am–6pm Mondays to Saturdays (except Wednesdays), 4pm–8pm Sundays, and during the high season (December 20–February 10) 10am–10pm Mondays to Saturdays, 4pm–10pm Sundays

DISCOVER ARTISTS AND ARTISANS

  • Kick off your morning with the city’s finest small-batch, house-roasted espresso
  • Get an intimate, up-close look at Colombia’s dynamic modern art scene
  • Check out the local outpost of a trendsetting New York City contemporary art gallery

North American travelers will likely remember “Juan Valdez,” that straw-hatted, mustachioed farmer from popular TV commercials who “handpicked only the best beans” from his Colombian coffee plantation. The Valdez character was wholly fictitious, conceived by a Madison Avenue ad agency in the 1950s, but coffee genuinely is Colombia’s second highest-grossing export (after oil). Despite coffee’s central role in the economy, however, the culture of lingering-at-cafés-and-fetishizing-rare-blends is relatively new to Colombia. Which makes Época Espresso Bar a very welcome find indeed. Coffee artisans Julian Gutiérrez and Nikol Cobo source small-batch beans from eight independent farms around the country and roast them here on-site; they’ve even restored a rare 1950s La Pavoni espresso machine to brew their specialty drinks. Linger over a marvelously nuanced ristretto or a refreshing iced latte—perhaps with a golden-hued arepa de huevo or waffles with blueberries—before striking out on a contemporary art stroll. Begin your walk a few blocks south of the café at the Museo de Arte Moderno de Cartagena (Cartagena Museum of Modern Art), which occupies a former customs house beside the Plaza San Pedro; inside you’ll find a small-but-essential permanent collection of Caribbean-influenced Colombian art as well as special exhibitions. Then walk six minutes northwest to NH Galeria, just opposite the landmark Baluarte de Santo Domingo. This expertly curated outpost of New York City’s Nohra Haime gallery features rotating exhibits of Colombian and international artists—recent highlights included the riotous rainbow-colored sculpture of French artist Niki de Saint Phalle and the glittering gold-and-silver tapestries of Colombia’s own Olga de Amaral.

Have your taxi drop you in the Centro at Catedral de Santa Catalina (a 30-minute ride from the hotel), and you’ll find Época Espresso Bar just around the corner. From there it’s an easy walk to both the museum and gallery.

ÉPOCA ESPRESSO BAR
34-52 Calle de Arzobispado
+57-5-664-1806
facebook.com/weare.epoca
8am–9pm daily

MUSEO DE ARTE MODERNO DE CARTAGENA
4-08 Calle 30, Plaza San Pedro Claver
mamcartagena.org
9am–12pm and 3pm–7pm Mondays to Fridays, 4pm–9pm weekends and holidays

NH GALERIA
33-36 Carrera 2
+57-5-664-0561
nhgaleria.com
10am–6pm Mondays to Saturdays (except Wednesdays), 4pm–8pm Sundays, and during the high season (December 20–February 10) 10am–10pm Mondays to Saturdays, 4pm–10pm Sundays

ZENÚ GOLD MUSEUM
Carrera 4, 33-26, Plaza de Bolívar
+57-5-660-0778
banrepcultural.org/gold-museum
10am–1pm and 2pm–5pm Tuesdays to Saturdays, 10am–4pm Sundays and holidays

JOYERÍA CARIBE MUSEUM AND FACTORY
31-18 Calle San Pedro Claver
+57-5-660-0051
jcemeralds.co
9am–7pm daily

LUCY JEWELRY
3-19 Calle Santo Domingo
+57-5-664-4255
lucyjewelrycartagena.com
9am–8pm Mondays to Saturdays

GO FOR THE GOLD

  • Unearth a spectacular collection of pre-Columbian artifacts at the city’s gold museum
  • Delve into the unlikely and largely untold history of the emerald trade
  • Select your own stones for custom-crafted jewelry designs

Colombia has a deep and often controversial history with gold. Pedro de Heredia sailed into Cartagena’s protected bay in 1533 to establish what became Spain’s primary Caribbean port in South America. The Spaniards amassed vast wealth for the crown through the slave trade and, not least, the plundering of gold and precious stones from the graves of the indigenous Zenú tribe. At the Museo del Oro Zenú (or Zenú Gold Museum), facing Plaza de Bolivar in the Centro, you can explore what remains of intricate pre-Columbian gold artifacts, Zenú pottery, and the fraught legacy of the gold trade. Carrying on the theme of shiny precious things, make your next stop at the neighboring Joyería Caribe Museo de la Esmeralda (Emerald Museum). At this museum-in-miniature, the complex mining process and beguiling history of “the Mother’s Stone”—did you know Cleopatra was purportedly the first to wear emeralds?—is told through dioramas and display boxes, culminating in a visit to the in-house showroom. Colombia is the world’s largest producer of emeralds, according to Jessica Paula Gomez, a member of the knowledgeable staff; emeralds here are typically lighter, clearer, and possessed of a deep, rich green hue that sets the stones apart. You can buy one of the displayed baubles, set in 18k gold, or choose from a collection of loose stones and have a custom piece crafted in 36 hours. If you prefer to shop around for a stone-studded souvenir, we’ve found consistently high-quality stock at Lucy Jewelry, an elegant store housed in a 17th-century mansion, just a three-minute walk away.

Have your car or taxi drop you at Plaza de Bolívar in the Centro, a 30-minute trip from the Conrad; the Gold Museum and Emerald Museum are right next door to one another, while Lucy Jewelry is just a few blocks northwest.

ZENÚ GOLD MUSEUM
Carrera 4, 33-26, Plaza de Bolívar
+57-5-660-0778
banrepcultural.org/gold-museum
10am–1pm and 2pm–5pm Tuesdays to Saturdays, 10am–4pm Sundays and holidays

JOYERÍA CARIBE MUSEUM AND FACTORY
31-18 Calle San Pedro Claver
+57-5-660-0051
jcemeralds.co
9am–7pm daily

LUCY JEWELRY
3-19 Calle Santo Domingo
+57-5-664-4255
lucyjewelrycartagena.com
9am–8pm Mondays to Saturdays

PURE KITESURF
Manzanillo del Mar beach
+57-321-521-5110
purekitesurf.com

RIDE LIKE THE WIND

  • Get a serious adrenaline rush with a private kitesurfing lesson
  • Whip across the waves in one of the country’s premier surfing spots
  • Unwind for a few hours on a broad secluded beach

“It’s the best sport on earth,” says kitesurfer Christina Varveris, “because you’re constantly learning new tricks. You never get bored, because it’s never the same ride twice. And when you’re gliding out on the waves, you forget about anything else—hunger, thirst, any problems back on land. It’s just you, the kite, the board, and the ocean.” Varveris, a former journalist and Swiss expat, took up the sport nearly a decade ago, and quickly mastered the intricate art of reading the breeze, skimming the waves, and catching the wind just right. Her passion led naturally into teaching, and after quitting her day job, she founded Pure Kitesurf, now one of Cartagena’s top kitesurfing outfits. Varveris and her multilingual instructors base themselves just south of the Conrad at secluded Manzanillo del Mar beach, whose steady winds and minimal waves make for an ideal classroom. For the uninitiated, Varveris says, the only prerequisite is knowing how to swim; she and her crew will take care of the rest. Choose either a private or group class for the two-to-three-hour introductory lesson. The first half is devoted to getting familiar with the equipment and maneuvering the kite on the beach, while the second half takes you into the water to learn the basics of body drag, kite handling, and relaunch. If you get hooked, sign up for the full nine-hour program (held over three or four days). For those already up to speed, Pure Kitesurf can rent you all the necessary equipment.

The Conrad concierge can help you book your introductory lesson (or a longer multiday course) with Pure Kitesurf, or contact them directly. Manzanillo del Mar beach is just a 10-minute taxi ride south of the Conrad.

PURE KITESURF
Manzanillo del Mar beach
+57-321-521-5110
purekitesurf.com

LA MULATA
9-58 Calle Quero
+57-5-664-6222
restaurantelamulata.co
11:30am–10pm Mondays to Saturdays

LA COCINA DE PEPINA
9A-06 Callejón Vargas
+57-300-856-5189
facebook.com/lacocina.depepina
lunch 12pm–4pm daily, dinner 7pm–9:30pm Tuesdays to Saturdays

CARMEN CARTAGENA
8-19 Calle del Santísimo
+57-5-664-5116
carmencartagena.com
12pm–3pm and 6pm–10:30pm daily

MOSHI
8-19 Calle del Santísimo
+57-5-664-5116
moshico.com.co
12pm–3pm and 6pm–10:30pm daily

MARIA
34-60 Calle del Colegio, Local 2
+57-5-660-5380
mariacartagena.com
lunch 12pm–3pm Mondays to Fridays, dinner 6:30pm–11pm Mondays to Saturdays

INTERNO
Cárcel de Mujeres de San Diego, Calle 39
+57-310-260-0134
restauranteinterno.com
dinner 7pm–11pm Tuesdays to Sundays

BOOK A HOT TABLE

  • Get the inside track on Cartagena’s burgeoning restaurant scene
  • Indulge in traditional Caribbean classics or wildly inventive Latin-Japanese cuisine
  • Dine out for a worthy cause—inside a women’s prison

As Cartagena’s dining scene expands, picking favorites has become a lot more difficult. It’s a good problem to have. For traditional Caribbean fare, locals are evenly split between La Mulata, a hip, reasonably priced haunt in Centro known for fresh fish-of-the-day platters, and La Cocina de Pepina, an institution in Getsemaní, for the misleadingly named cabezas de gato, balls of mashed plantain or yuca with onion, garlic, and a spicy-sweet chili sauce. Then there are the two innovative restaurants run by husband-and-wife team and California transplants Carmen Angel and Rob Pevitts, which sit side by side in a converted colonial residence: Carmen, with its glassed-in, greenhouse-like bar and tranquil courtyard, serves Caribbean-Latin dishes with a twist (try the pargo platero, a tropical-tinged, pan-seared snapper in a pineapple, cachaça, and yellow curry sauce); while the Japanese-inflected Moshi is a wildly creative omakase-style adventure with either a seven-course tasting menu or small plates such as flaky sea bass collar or a soulful ramen with 12-hour-roasted pork chicharrón. Chef Alejandro Ramirez’s spot Maria (next door to Juan Felipe Camacho’s popular Don Juan restaurant) has design-magazine interiors and beautifully plated dishes to match, including a grilled sea bass with bacon succotash or a coconut-and-peanut salmon curry. But the city’s most innovative restaurant concept, Interno, also has the most surprising address: inside the San Diego Women’s Prison. Conceived by actress and model Johana Bahamón, Interno employs the female inmates as kitchen and front-of-house staff. The lively, open-air patio dining room buzzes with fashionable Cartageneros, and the three-course menu offers comfort-food classics that Colombian grandmothers have been making for generations.

Ask the concierge to make reservations for any of the above restaurants, as they all tend to book up in advance. All are within a 30-minute taxi ride of the hotel.

LA MULATA
9-58 Calle Quero
+57-5-664-6222
restaurantelamulata.co
11:30am–10pm Mondays to Saturdays

LA COCINA DE PEPINA
9A-06 Callejón Vargas
+57-300-856-5189
facebook.com/lacocina.depepina
lunch 12pm–4pm daily, dinner 7pm–9:30pm Tuesdays to Saturdays

CARMEN CARTAGENA
8-19 Calle del Santísimo
+57-5-664-5116
carmencartagena.com
12pm–3pm and 6pm–10:30pm daily

MOSHI
8-19 Calle del Santísimo
+57-5-664-5116
moshico.com.co
12pm–3pm and 6pm–10:30pm daily

MARIA
34-60 Calle del Colegio, Local 2
+57-5-660-5380
mariacartagena.com
lunch 12pm–3pm Mondays to Fridays, dinner 6:30pm–11pm Mondays to Saturdays

INTERNO
Cárcel de Mujeres de San Diego, Calle 39
+57-310-260-0134
restauranteinterno.com
dinner 7pm–11pm Tuesdays to Sundays

EL BARON
31-7 Carrera 4, Plaza San Pedro Claver
+57-5-664-3105
elbaron.co
5pm–1am Sundays and Mondays, 12pm–1am Tuesdays, 12pm–2am Wednesdays to Saturdays

LA CAVA DEL PURO
3-106 Calle de las Damas, Pasaje La Candelaria Local 1
+57-5-660-6081
lacavadelpuro.com
9am–8pm Mondays to Saturdays, 11am–7pm Sundays

ALQUÍMICO
34-24 Calle del Colegio
+57-318-845-0433
alquimico.com
5pm–2am Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays, 5pm–3:30am Saturdays

RAISE THE BAR ON A COCKTAIL CRAWL

  • Learn the trade secrets of Cartagena’s most charming bartender
  • Sample rare aged rums and hand-rolled cigars
  • Sip the city’s best negroni to the infectious beat of a live champeta band

Without fail, the person who holds the key to unlocking any city’s best-kept secrets is a trusty bartender. In Cartagena, that means bending the indulgent ear of Oscar Velasco, the mixologist behind the top-tier drinks program at El Baron, whose menu of cocktails—all named after women—is meant to take patrons on a round-the-world journey. Over a Keiko (a bracing blend of vodka, rice liquor, and Japanese sencha tea served in a porcelain cup), Oscar divulges other not-to-be-missed drinking dens around town. Fine rum and cigars? Visit Oscar’s pal Domenico at El Cava del Puro, sinking into a leather sofa while sipping on 20-year-aged rum and puffing a hand-rolled house-brand cigar. Seeking a delicious cure for any ailment? Alquímico’s nattily dressed barkeeps mix up libations, referred to as “remedies,” drawing ingredients from apothecary-style jars and tinctures lined up on glowing glass shelves. The infused-rum drinks are also a standout. Take your cure in the spacious downstairs bar or up on the rooftop lounge.

All of the above are within easy walking distance of the Plaza San Pedro Claver in Centro, which is roughly a 30-minute trip from the Conrad without traffic.

EL BARON
31-7 Carrera 4, Plaza San Pedro Claver
+57-5-664-3105
elbaron.co
5pm–1am Sundays and Mondays, 12pm–1am Tuesdays, 12pm–2am Wednesdays to Saturdays

LA CAVA DEL PURO
3-106 Calle de las Damas, Pasaje La Candelaria Local 1
+57-5-660-6081
lacavadelpuro.com
9am–8pm Mondays to Saturdays, 11am–7pm Sundays

ALQUÍMICO
34-24 Calle del Colegio
+57-318-845-0433
alquimico.com
5pm–2am Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays, 5pm–3:30am Saturdays